Preparing for the overhaul...

Saturday, September 8, 2012

In Search of Corrugated Roofing

If things go as we hope--and that's kind of a big "if" right now--then we'll be in the right location, but in a relatively small space.  Which certainly isn't the end of the world, not in any circumstances and certainly not in ours, because we're talking temporary lodging.  It's difficult, moving.  But, while we (hopefully) build our house, we've found a place that'd be perfect to rent.  We're waiting to hear back on that as I write.

I don't think we'll be putting our old house on the market until we've at least got a pretty good bead on what's happening with the new one and, preferably, not until we're actually ready to move.  Our old house is, um, nowhere near our current location and, for a variety of reasons, we want and need to stay where we are.

So I was thinking, OK, assuming things go our way, I'll have some space--there's a lovely upstairs bedroom that'd make a perfect craft room--but not enough for everything I'd like to work on.  Certainly it'd be a tight fit for two full-sized dollhouses (although I may try anyway).  I was thinking I'd bring up either the not-Lincoln or the Haunted House, and something else small.  For awhile now, I've wanted to make a Maine-style shack in miniature.  It seems like it'd be a really fun project--or, at least, certainly a personality-filled one!

I've been driving around, taking pictures for inspiration.

Now, obviously, not all of Maine looks like this.  Some of it looks much worse!  Heh.  Don't worry, our generally, um, creative approach to architecture is a subject of nearly endless humor among Mainers.  And, of course, many of the houses--here and all across the state--are simply beautiful.  Naturally, there aren't too many of each as we're thankfully still pretty rural.  I also took some (in my humble opinion, naturally) wonderful pictures of farms, fields, etc etc etc but those aren't so interesting.  Unless, of course, you happen to dig pictures of sheep.

I have a little Greenleaf kit I'll be bashing--and if anyone's interested, I'll post more of my inspiration pictures when I'm a little further along--and a general idea of how I'll finish it.  But what I don't have is corrugated roofing.  I bought some from Oakridge Hobbies, a delightful establishment I patronize frequently.  This stuff purported to be 1:12 scale.  I was excited for it to arrive and then...it was HUGE!  HUGE!  Literally, it would've looked normal on a full-sized house.  There are, of course, hundreds of other sizes of corrugated roofing--for our model train-making friends--but the descriptions of size, etc are, at least to me, almost nonsensical.  

So what now?  It's not exactly economically feasible to buy one sheet of each size, hoping for the best.  Although, at this rate, I may have to...

8 comments:

otterine said...

I have a tutorial on my site from my ghost town ranch: http://www.otterine.com/blog/blog1.php/tin-roof Might not be the exact stuff you want need, but I thought it might help. :]

CJ said...

BRILLIANT!!! Thank you :-)

Daydreamer said...

I haven't tried it, but "Corrugated boxes" are made of corrugated cardboard.... I've seen people tear the top layer off and the remaining part can pass for rusted corrugated roofing!
Your tips are great and your standards are high and the results show it! Your work is beautiful!!!

chris said...

There are roofs that are made of durable materials. These kinds of roofs will help you make sure that the weather does not have a bad effect on your home.

Michelle said...

You can buy sheets of corrugated card from good craft shops. All it needs it painting et. :o))

Oh I can relate to moving issues right now too.....I hope all goes well for you. :o)

Michelle :o)

CJ said...

@Michelle, what are your moving issues? Hopefully nothing too stressful...

Michelle said...

Oh, moving house and seeking a job transfer too, to many counties away.

I've done big moves before, they just take tons of sorting out and one big balancing act, especially when it involves my job too. I hope to move back to proper UK countryside and to be very near family. :o))))))

Michelle :o)

Anonymous said...

I was rinsing the top of a Kentucky fried chicken bucket lid to put back on and it came apart.. between the top and bottom layer is very small corrugated cardboard just the right scale ..I used it for the roof on a potting shed.. painted it with silver gray paint then used brown and burnt sienna for the rust..Judi